The Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life offers several classes throughout the year. Below are a short description of the courses provided by the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life.

  • IU 273
  • Spring – Full Semester
  • 2 credits

This class is designed as an introductory leadership development course aimed at examining leadership within the context of Fraternity and Sorority Life. Our course begins with an exploration of the unique aspects of fraternity and sorority, specifically: organizational ritual and values, organizational identity and culture, and a shared commitment to growth and development. Emphasis is placed on understanding personal leadership identity and style. Values, characteristics, and developmental tasks as a foundation for continued leadership development will also be examined.  The purpose of our course is to reflect on one’s ability to create positive and lasting change with your fraternity or sorority.

  • IU 273
  • Spring – Full Semester
  • 2 Credits

This class is designed as an advanced leadership development course aimed at examining leadership specifically within the context of Fraternity and Sorority Life, and is geared specifically towards sophomores, juniors and seniors who currently hold (or have held) officer positions within their organization. Emphasis is placed on understanding how common purpose, organizational culture and dynamics, and ethical decision making influence leadership and being change agents in the fraternity and sorority context. A focus on understanding how as leaders we can continue to make fraternities and sororities relevant into the future by building coalitions and connections will be examined as a foundation for the course.

  • WS 397
  • Fall – Full Semester
  • 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to explore and discuss the complexity of human differences in today’s society through class readings, class discussion and activities, and reflection. This class is also designed as a leadership development course and will help you examine leadership in the context of inclusion, diversity and social justice. Emphasis is placed on understanding your personal identity, as well as understanding how to lead with a sense of responsibility toward and with different others. Strategies for allyship and interdependently leading within a global community will also be examined.

  • WS 495
  • Spring – First Eight Weeks
  • 1 credit

One in 4 women, 1 in 6 men and 1 in 2 transgender people,  will be the victim of an attempted or completed sexual assault in their lifetime, and research also indicates that rape supportive culture and sexual assault take on unique shapes in the fraternity and sorority context. This includes the reality that sorority women are more likely to experience sexual assault than unaffiliated women. Fraternity and Sorority Members Against Sexual Assault aims to:

  • Dispel myths surrounding rape, sexual assault, and relationship violence
  • Consider how a rape supportive culture is established and unique ways this culture is perpetuated in the fraternity and sorority community
  • Discuss gender socialization, gender specific programs, and healthy relationships, all relating to being a member of a fraternity or sorority
  • Develop a firm understanding of the resources available for survivors of rape, sexual assault, and other forms of interpersonal violence
  • Foster collaboration among members of the fraternity and sorority community concerned with the health and well-being of CSU students and deconstructing rape supportive culture
  • WS 495
  • Spring – Second Eight Weeks
  • 1 credit

This class is to deepen and enliven the conversation related to rape supportive culture in our society, and most specifically, in fraternity and sorority life.  This class requires foundational knowledge about rape supportive culture, and works to deepen one’s understanding from an individual, community, and systemic lens.  The primary focus of the class is to take the theoretical knowledge in Fraternity and Sorority Members Against Sexual Assault Part 1 and apply it to our current community.  Examples of questions and conversations are:

  • What can I do in society to change the larger culture of rape supportive culture?
  • Is rape supportive culture permanent?
  • How can I interrupt acts of rape supportive culture when I notice them?
  • How do I communicate with others about this topic?